4 min read

Wouldn’t it be good if you could save the world with a click of your finger – Mary Poppins style? Plastic pollution: click. Global warming: click. Suddenly our world is a better place. Well, it’s unfortunate that life doesn’t work like that, but there are things we can do, choices we can make, that will help lighten our footprint on the world. And believe it or not, all from the comfort of your sofa.

An eco-friendly sofa – Sofology’s Pioneer range

Sofology have just launched their first eco-friendly sofa, the Pioneer. This is not some lumpy hessian sack-style sofa. The Pioneer is a contemporary styled sofa range that comes in almost every shape and size you could need, from an armchair to a 3-seater corner piece. True to form, it’s a lesson in style and combines functionality with sustainability and on-trend design. Think Scandi minimalism with the right amount of sofa ‘chubbiness’ for comfort.

I took my family along to see the Pioneer in the flesh, in-store so we could give it a proper trial. When it comes to choosing a sofa, how it looks plays a big part but, equally, comfort is so important. As you can see, there was no holding back from my kids as they lounged around and played with their toys. We all resolutely decided this was a sofa to kick off your shoes and chill out on. But how is it eco-friendly?

How is the fabric eco friendly?

Let’s start with the fabric. The Pioneer range comes in a choice of soft tones of pink, grey, teal, mustard, and charcoal in plain and herringbone textures. Beautiful and something for every taste. But what is the fabric made of?

Two very clever yarns have been woven to make this sustainable fabric. The first is from a company called Repreve, who recycle plastic bottles by turning them into yarn. The second is from Greencare who have created a yarn from recycled plastic bottles and recycled textiles. All in all, every fibre in this fabric is 100% recycled. Now, when you think of fabrics that are made from recycled plastic bottles, you may think of raincoats, yoga pants and swimwear: things that are synthetic in texture. But the amazing thing about the fabric used on the Pioneer eco-friendly sofa range is that it is soft. So soft, in fact, it feels almost velvety to the touch.

And how about the scatter cushions? Well, the backs and interiors are again made from recycled plastic bottles and the fabric from recycled textiles. There’s not an ounce of virgin material used here.

What’s inside the sofa?

But what about the fillings you sit on? Good question. Although it’s not something we really think about, it’s what’s inside a sofa that really counts – predominantly for comfort and lumbar support, but also for the positive impact it can have on our planet. This range doesn’t use traditional foam, instead it’s filled with a fibre called Quallofil Blue, made in collaboration with PLASTICBANK.

It will not surprise you to learn that this too is made from fibres which are 50% recycled plastic. Plastic waste around the world is collected in exchange for education, healthcare, food and cash. It’s known as Social Plastic and is designed to clean up our world and also support and help communities thrive. It’s then transformed into this high-quality seat filling that you can snuggle up on without it losing its shape.

This is a sofa designed to last

A sofa is an investment piece, which is why it’s amazing that Sofology’s sofas come with a 20-year structural guarantee. And let’s be frank, using something for its full life is one of the best ways of making something more sustainable. The frames are made from sustainably sourced timber, which means that the wood they use comes from forests that are harvested responsibly and are continually replenished – just one more feel-good factor of this Pioneer range.

This is a sofa on which you can sit back and relax, safe in the knowledge that you’re helping to make the world a better place.

EXPLORE THE PIONEER
Karen Maurice
About Karen Maurice

Karen Maurice, founder of n4mummy.com is a self-confessed lover of fashion, design and living ethically and sustainably. Formerly a buyer for the UK high street, she became disillusioned with the negative impact of fast fashion on people and planet. Her aim is to see beyond the latest high street trend and practice being content with buying less but selecting well. Her sustainable journey may have started with clothing but has slowly worked its way into every area of life as she seeks to live a lower waste life with her husband and three kids in North London.